Book Review: Vampire Films a Fang-tastic Read

Gary A. Smith’s book” Vampire Films of the 1970s Dracula to Blacula and Every Fang Between” ( McFarland, 2017 240pgs) is a wonderful book that every horror fan should own.

This guide to Vampire films starts by Smith writing that the movies made during this decade were mixed; some were great and others horrible, but lets the reader make the final determination. Smith then starts walking the reader through the many known (and unknown) films that was made dealing with vampires, which some movies stuck with the normal themes of vampirism, while others were so far out there that they are only vaguely considered vampire films.

The first chapter is given to the Christopher Lee films (which started in the 1960s) that entered into the 1970s, such as “Taste the Blood of Dracula,” and his final film in 1973, “The Satanic Rites of Dracula.” The next several chapters deal with other Hammer productions, including the failed “Vampirella” film in 1976, along with other British Vampire works like “Bloodsuckers,” “The House That Dripped Blood,” and “The Vault of Horrors.”

Smith’s book covers so many types of films that true fans will appreciate how he covers films from France, Italy, Spain, and Asia. The behind the scenes tales of some of these films are not only interesting, but sometimes just plain humorous, such as when one director hired his stockbroker to play Dracula, changed his name, and pieced together parts from other movies in order to make his films. Even the vampires in the Asian films have a different approach to the vampire character; instead of walking they hop according to Smith. Smith even covers a chapter of the book that features famous Mexican Wrestler Santo, who Smith writes “met more monsters than Abbott and Costello.”

The great thing about this book is that Smith covers all Vampire films, not just a few famous ones, and covers genres, such as comedies, some hard to find films, and a section that he calls “oddities.” The book not only gives out some background of the films, but also gives written reviews by several named critics, along with Smith’s own opinion of the movies. This book is not just for entertainment, but is one filled with knowledgeable facts that will make the reader find themselves looking up some of these rarer works to watch.

One (of the many) interesting chapters that comes to mind is the one on Elizabeth Bathory, who was known as “The Bloody Countess,” because of the rumored stories of murdering hundreds of women and bathing in their blood to stay young and beautiful. The several films mentioned in this chapter are definitely ones that this reviewer will be searching out for viewing.

Smith discusses some television movies of the decade, such as “Salem’s Lot,” ABC’s “Vampire,” and the “Dark Shadows” TV series. He also briefly covers Dracula and vampires in novels and comic books as well.

Gary A. Smith’s manual is well written without boring the reader with too many facts, and has a great summary of each of the major films that he covers in each chapter. There are enjoyable black and white photos added in each chapter, along with a Filmography at the end of the publication. This book is a wonderful textbook, thesaurus, and historical read all in one collection. From “Blacula,” “Love at First Bite,” ” Count Yorga,” to Frank Langella’s “Dracula” and Klaus Kiniski’s “Nosferatu The Vampire,” Gary A. Smith’s book is one that film fans should sink their teeth into.

 

 

McFarland books can be ordered at:

http://www.mcfarlandpub.com or call the order line at (800-253-2187).

 

Vampire Films of the 1970s Dracula to Blacula and Every Fang Between. McFarland, 2017. ISBN: 978-0-7864-9779-9. eISBN: 978-1-4766-2559-1.

 

I would like to thank McFarland for the review copy of this book.

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2 thoughts on “Book Review: Vampire Films a Fang-tastic Read

  1. Thank you for your review of my book which McFarland made me aware of today. I am so happy you enjoyed reading it and you were very kind in your review of it.

    Like

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