Book Review: Vampire Films a Fang-tastic Read

Gary A. Smith’s book” Vampire Films of the 1970s Dracula to Blacula and Every Fang Between” ( McFarland, 2017 240pgs) is a wonderful book that every horror fan should own.

This guide to Vampire films starts by Smith writing that the movies made during this decade were mixed; some were great and others horrible, but lets the reader make the final determination. Smith then starts walking the reader through the many known (and unknown) films that was made dealing with vampires, which some movies stuck with the normal themes of vampirism, while others were so far out there that they are only vaguely considered vampire films.

The first chapter is given to the Christopher Lee films (which started in the 1960s) that entered into the 1970s, such as “Taste the Blood of Dracula,” and his final film in 1973, “The Satanic Rites of Dracula.” The next several chapters deal with other Hammer productions, including the failed “Vampirella” film in 1976, along with other British Vampire works like “Bloodsuckers,” “The House That Dripped Blood,” and “The Vault of Horrors.”

Smith’s book covers so many types of films that true fans will appreciate how he covers films from France, Italy, Spain, and Asia. The behind the scenes tales of some of these films are not only interesting, but sometimes just plain humorous, such as when one director hired his stockbroker to play Dracula, changed his name, and pieced together parts from other movies in order to make his films. Even the vampires in the Asian films have a different approach to the vampire character; instead of walking they hop according to Smith. Smith even covers a chapter of the book that features famous Mexican Wrestler Santo, who Smith writes “met more monsters than Abbott and Costello.”

The great thing about this book is that Smith covers all Vampire films, not just a few famous ones, and covers genres, such as comedies, some hard to find films, and a section that he calls “oddities.” The book not only gives out some background of the films, but also gives written reviews by several named critics, along with Smith’s own opinion of the movies. This book is not just for entertainment, but is one filled with knowledgeable facts that will make the reader find themselves looking up some of these rarer works to watch.

One (of the many) interesting chapters that comes to mind is the one on Elizabeth Bathory, who was known as “The Bloody Countess,” because of the rumored stories of murdering hundreds of women and bathing in their blood to stay young and beautiful. The several films mentioned in this chapter are definitely ones that this reviewer will be searching out for viewing.

Smith discusses some television movies of the decade, such as “Salem’s Lot,” ABC’s “Vampire,” and the “Dark Shadows” TV series. He also briefly covers Dracula and vampires in novels and comic books as well.

Gary A. Smith’s manual is well written without boring the reader with too many facts, and has a great summary of each of the major films that he covers in each chapter. There are enjoyable black and white photos added in each chapter, along with a Filmography at the end of the publication. This book is a wonderful textbook, thesaurus, and historical read all in one collection. From “Blacula,” “Love at First Bite,” ” Count Yorga,” to Frank Langella’s “Dracula” and Klaus Kiniski’s “Nosferatu The Vampire,” Gary A. Smith’s book is one that film fans should sink their teeth into.

 

 

McFarland books can be ordered at:

http://www.mcfarlandpub.com or call the order line at (800-253-2187).

 

Vampire Films of the 1970s Dracula to Blacula and Every Fang Between. McFarland, 2017. ISBN: 978-0-7864-9779-9. eISBN: 978-1-4766-2559-1.

 

I would like to thank McFarland for the review copy of this book.

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Book Review: Say Yes to Chris Jericho’s “No”

Following Chris Jericho for me has gone back many years. I first started watching him in Jim Cornette’s Smoky Mountain Wrestling, and became a fan of his in Ted Turner’s World Championship Wrestling. I met him in 1998 in Boardman, Ohio at a WCW signing event, where he talked about his love for Christian Metal bands. I had the honor of writing a review for his last book in 2014 (“The Best in The World”) for Slam Sports Wrestling in Canada. I am a constant listener to his podcast “Talk Is Jericho,” and I used to read his columns in Metal Edge magazine in college (which I still have in my collection).

Chris Jericho has been an actor, wrestler, writer, podcaster, dancer (he was on the TV Show “Dancing With The Stars”) and a singer of a Hard Rock band, so who better to write a book on achieving a person’s life goals than Jericho? In his latest book, “No Is A Four Letter Word: How I Failed Spelling But Succeeded In Life,” (Da Capo Press) Jericho takes the reader through his successes and failures in life, along with the valuable information he learned throughout his journeys.

Each chapter of the book deals with advice that Jericho offers, called Principles, named after a celebrity, such as The Gene Simmons Principle, The Paul Stanley Principle (who writes the book’s Forward) The Vince McMahon Principle, and even The Yoda Principle. Each chapter has stories explaining the Principles from Jericho’s life, including when he met Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards, when his band Fozzy played a concert on the Kiss Cruise (which didn’t go quite as planned), and explaining WWE Owner Vince McMahon’s work ethic.  The topics deal with ideas enjoying the moment, eliminating negativity, let failed attempts in the past, and advice that a person never knows who is watching them. The topics deal with everyday issues, from the workplace to achieving a goal in the person’s life.

Jericho provides great stories such as his encounter with Yoko Ono at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Ceremonies, meeting Gene Simmons at the Kiss founder’s house, and meeting Alice Cooper’s manager Shep Gordon. There are also wrestling stories with backstage tales of his recent WWE programs with Dean Ambrose and A.J. Styles.  Some funny tales include being on a Fozzy tour with the band Saxon that involves a chicken, when he sang at Lemmy Kilmister’s  (of the band Motorhead) 70th Birthday Concert, and a story dealing with management of the band The Scorpions for his podcast that is not only humorous but also makes the reader just as frustrated as Jericho was during the event.  These stories all are combined throughout the book with one liner references to Star Wars, The Blues Brothers, Kiss, Kool and The Gang, and The Nelson Brothers (and it wouldn’t be a Chris Jericho book without some Canadian Band references like Kick Axe).

Some self help books by celebrities are laughable when someone who was born into money tries to tell someone how to achieve goals, but Jericho’s advice is from someone who really paid dues and failed in order to achieve his goals of being a pro wrestler and a singer in a rock band. This book is filled with interesting tips (some are even common sense) with a touch of humor. With this being Jericho’s fourth book, one would think there is not much left for him to write about, but that is not the case.  One does not need to be a wrestling fan in order to enjoy the stories and advice that this book entails.

 

To read my previous review of Chris Jericho’s other book, go to http://slam.canoe.com/Slam/Wrestling/Reviews/2014/06/13/21738661.html or to read my other published reviews, go to www.llumleyportfolio.wordpress.com

For more information on Da Capo Books, go to www.Dacapopress.com

Loving It-Some of the Most Romantic Songs in Music

It’s hard to define what exactly the word “romantic” is, or what songs is or is not considered romantic. There are the standard ones, like Etta James “At Last” or Dolly Parton/Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You,” which are usually played at weddings. One definition of the word is “displaying or expressing love or strong affection.”  This blog is going to look at a few of the songs that I would list in my favorite romantic songs, in no particular order, with the dates in the parenthesis. Maybe it is one of yours.

  1. “Lady In Red” –Chris Deburg (1986). This song was from his “Into the Light” Album, and is the song that made him famous. Deburg was said to have written the song about his wife when they first met, stating that men can’t remember what their wives were wearing when they first met. The song hit #3 in the U.S. in 1987, and hit #1 in other countries. Rolling Stone once ranked it on its Worst Songs of the 1980s, which to me, show how stupid the magazine and their so called experts are.  The song has a slow groove and the lyrics are very poetic.
  1. “Could I Have This Dance”-Anne Murray (1980). This song was everywhere for years after it was released, and was a wedding staple. The song was for a Greatest Hits Album, and was played in the movie “Urban Cowboy.” It was a #1 Country Hit, along with being a #33 Pop Hit. I remember this song being played at dances when my uncle would deejay them. Every time I hear the song, I can picture that 45 spinning around at those dances. Not only is Anne Murray underrated as a singer, but the song is pure magic. The theme about the dance being a symbol of life is also proof of the romance in the song.
  1. “God Only Knows”-The Beach Boys (1966). I remember watching an ABC Movie of the Beach Boys, and the part where this song is being recorded. The actor playing drummer Dennis Wilson is listening to the song and states that it’s the most beautiful song he ever heard. Whether Wilson really said that or not, the statement is true. This is one of my favorite Beach Boys songs, and most would be surprised to find out that it barely broke the Top 40 Charts, at #39.  The orchestration and the overlaying of vocals made the song a classic.  This song was off the famous “Pet Sounds” Album, which was considered Brian Wilson’s greatest accomplishment. This is one of the greatest songs ever recorded, and decades later, it is still being recorded by artists in many genres.
The Beach Boys
  1. “I’ll Be True To You”-The Oak Ridge Boys (1978). Picking out just one song by The Oaks to make this list was very difficult. They have recorded many romantic songs in their careers. In my mind, The Oaks are up there with the Beach Boy, Barry Manilow, and Kiss as my Top American Institutions in American Music.  This song was from the “Ya’ll Come Back Saloon” Album, and was the group’s first #1 single.  Duane Allen’s smooth and soulful voice about a couple that falls in love and breaks up, even though she stays true to him until she dies, makes the song even more heartbreaking.  The song was important in my childhood, being a big fan of the group, but it also shows how quality songwriting and soulful vocals that tell a story is missing in today’s Country Music. It was one of the first songs I heard in Country that made me listen to the layers of the orchestration and layering of the backing musicians as well as the upfront vocals.
  1. “If You Could Read My Mind”-Gordon Lightfoot (1970). Lightfoot is another underrated performer and songwriter that our younger generation is missing out on. His songs are pure poetry- in fact I used this song in teaching poetry when I was teaching English. Lightfoot uses a normal breakup and mixes the lyrics with references to cowboy movies, haunted ghosts, and books.  This song was a #5 hit in the U.S., #1 on the Easy Listening Charts, and #1 in Canada.
Gordon Lightfoot
  1. “I’m Sorry”-John Denver (1975). This song was a #1 hit in the U.S. about a man thinking back of a failed relationship.  I only discovered this song a few years ago, and it has become one of my favorite songs by Denver.  His line “I’m sorry about the ways things are in China” at first feels completely out of place, but it somehow fits.  The song is a short song, but is powerful in the lyrics, and Denver was one of the few artists that all he needed was his voice and a guitar to make a classic song.
  1. “Islands in the Stream”-Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton (1983). How could the most popular duet song not be on this list? The song was written by the Bee Gees, and was a huge hit (#1 on Pop, Country, and AC Charts), and is still recorded by acts all these years later. The medium tempo groove and the lines like “Baby when I met you/there was peace unknown/ I set out to get you with a fine tooth comb” is a typical Gibb Brothers lyrics that made them geniuses (how many songwriters can use a comb in a love song?).  The Bees Gees’ live version from their “One Night Only” Album is one of my favorite versions of this song. The catchy rhythm and unique lyrics makes this a classic. Barry Manilow and many others have recorded it throughout the years. Most younger fans may not understand how popular this song was when it came out, crossing over to all different charts.
  1. “Weekend in New England”-Barry Manilow (1976). Just like the Oaks, choosing a Manilow song is tough for this list (I could list all Manilow songs on here). I decided on this song, from the “This One’s For You” Album for its songwriting that makes you feel like you were on the “long rocky beaches.” The listener wonders if the singer will ever see the girl again, and the “story must now wait.” I can’t picture anyone but Manilow singing this song with the feeling and romanticism, even though he did not write the song.
Barry Manilow
  1. “Cool Night”-Paul Davis (1981). This year was a good year for music, giving us this gem from Davis. This is one of my favorite song from the whole decade, about a guy looking back at a summer breakup with the fall coming. This song was one of my earliest memories of listening to the local radio station and hearing the term Adult Contemporary when it came to music. This song is constantly played by me today. The theme of sitting by the fire on a cool night, is a common theme in romance, but Davis makes it lasting and not repetitive. Paul Davis was very underrated in his music and have many great songs.
  1. “I Love You More Than I Can Say”- Leo Sayer (1980). This song was actually a remake, which I did not know until I started doing research for this topic. It was written and recorded first by Sonny Curtis and Jerry Allison of The Crickets after Buddy Holly died. Bobby Vee then recorded the song in 1961. It was Vee’s version that Sayer went out and bought to learn for his “Living in a Fantasy” Album, when he was looking for an oldie to add to the album. Sayer’s version has more guitar and less piano than the previous recordings, and it hit #2 in late 1980 and early 1981, along with #1 on the AC Charts.  Sayer had other hits during his run within a few years, but this one is my favorite.

 

  1. “I’ll Be There”- The Escape Club (1991). Many people think this group was a One Hit Wonder after hitting #1 in 1988 with the song “Wild Wild West,” but they had a few hits that charted. This song was about a friend’s death, and is very broody, but beautiful in the same way. The song was produced by Peter Wolf. The heavy keyboards were common for music at the time, but it brings that eeriness to the song. The lines “In a whisper on the wind/On the smile of a new friend/Just think of me/And I’ll be there” makes me think of poetry that may have been during the Romantic Era. I was never a fan of “Wild Wild West,” but I still play this song often to this day. If you’ve been a follower of this page for a while, you’ll know how much I liked this song, due to my frequent mention of this 1991 single.

There are many other Romantic Songs I could mention on this list (I could probably list a hundred songs), such as “You Send Me” by Sam Cooke, “Waiting For A Girl Like You” by Foreigner, “Inside Silvia” by Rick Springfield, Berlin’s “Take My Breath Away,” and “Sara” by Starship to name a few more of my favorites. Maybe these songs would make your list, or maybe not. Hopefully you will take the time to explore these (along with other songs by the artists) to increase your music catalog.